A Modern Missions Experience in Latin America

Entradas etiquetadas como “Walking Man

Moving On Before Things Come to a Standstill in Cajamarca

Foreign companies mine gold and other minerals and metals in the mountains outside of Cajamarca. The people of Cajamarca are objecting to the large quanties of water the process uses, among other environmental challenges.

Tomorrow begins a general strike in the city of Cajamarca and the news reports are that it will last indefinitely until there is a resolution to the concerns about the mining companies in the State of Cajamarca. I’m concerned that the strike will close the roads and airport, so Udelia and I are leaving here on Wednesday to go to Lima, to make sure I can travel to the States on June 13.

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Up Early at Granja Porcon

This morning I spoke to two groups of workers at Granja Porcon. Services there start at 6 a.m. – they start each day out this way! I have to get up and going by 4am to get there on time because traffic is bad going up the mountain if I leave any later and have to compete with the commuters to the gold mines.

Tomorrow I leave for the mountains with two other men. We’re taking literature and the projector and films with us to help reach the people there. Pray for us!


Adding More Churches to the Cajamarca Group

I am in Chota now; I got here last night and today Pastor Jorge, another brother and I are taking literature, films and Bible courses to work with during the day as we invite people to attend an evening service.

Last week I was going through the mountains, travelling toward Trujillo, in a town called Magdalena that produces fruit and sugar cane. It’s between the high mountains. I walked up the mountains to visit a man had been with the Church of God (Anderson, Ind.) a long time ago. But when my wife and I left for mission work in Ecuador and Chile, no one ever came again to visit this man. There were three churches in this area and I met with the three leaders and they told me, “We are from the Church of God, but we’re all alone up here. No leader has ever come to visit us. We have received visits from pastors from other churches, but nothing from the Church of God.”

So in talking with these leaders and one other, they decided to join us. We are incorporated separately from the other Church of Gods (Anderson, Ind.) in Peru. To do that, we had to change our name, so we are actually recognized as a new movement, which is why the Church of God leaders in Peru have told me they don’t recognize our organization as being as part of theirs. But in actuality, each region has its own corporation, and ours is the largest of the Church of God in Peru. There are three churches in the jungle, two in Lima, five between Chepen and Chiclayo on the coast and we have 16 churches in Cajamarca. And we have a plan for each congregation to plant another church within the next two years, working in conjunction with other denominations if we need to. We are praying that God will provide leaders to continue this growth.


Here Comes the Rain Again

This picture of the recent mission group working with the children in Cajamarca show the tin roof we're having problems with now that rainy season has begun.

Well, the rains have begun in Cajamarca and they are complicating our meeting in the church in Cajamarca, because rain comes in everywhere with just our ill-fitted tin roof. I think we will move evening services to twice a week, one in one home, another in another home. While it doesn’t rain in the mornings, we will continue to have Sunday school for the children who come to sing, pray, do crafts and Bible Studies. We’re hoping these rains bring the blessing of funds for a proper roof.

In October, I will travel to Piura to visit a man who is asking for 10,000 tracts from Christian Triumph – I hope to be able to find his home! Then the following week, I will be travelling to a new place where we will hand out testaments and tracts and have some meetings in a school for some Bible studies. We’re praying that God will give us victory and that people will accept Jesus as their savior. The place is far from here – four hours by car then two on foot. We will have to carry the literature on horseback. It might also be possible to take our projector and show a film – that brings people in.